Journal

Tribe Spotlight: JJ Ruescas (DevOps)

Each month, WiFi Tribe encounters a new set of digital nomads ready to explore and get to know each other, creating our own little community. The diversity that makes up each tribe is always incredible with people from all over the world, working in virtually every profession that allows them to work remotely. Since we come across so many interesting people through our travels, we wanted take a closer look into one of our past tribe members and see how he makes it work in his favor.

Meet Juan Jose (or JJ), a Development Operations professional at Abila, Inc., who has been successfully working remotely for the past seven months. But, what is DevOps, you ask? According to JJ, DevOps is a technology "martial art", where methods like Kaizen (Continuous Improvement) and Fail-Fast/Self-Observation (of Tech teams) are combined with Technical skills like Automation, Scaling and Quality Assurance. Basically, JJ helps improve the flow between software developers and IT specialists. 

JJ was a part of both the Colombia and Brazil tribes (January - February 2017) and we caught up with him to grab his perspective on all things digital nomad; so here we go!

    Top 3 Things to Pack for Travel (must have's):

    WOSS Suspension straps (for the fit traveler) - It makes it super easy to work out while traveling because you are using your own body as the weight and you can set it up just about anywhere.

    Kindle PaperWhite - Since it's difficult to carry about physical books while I'm traveling for a longer period of time, the Kindle is perfect so I an always have something to read (note: e-ink is super important to help keep melatonin levels regulated).

    ExOfficio "Travel" Boxers - They are super comfy and suitable for any weather. Plus they have funny advertising: "17 countries, 6 weeks, one pair of award-winning underwear - Ok, maybe two"...haha

    Cocora Valley - Salento, Colombia

    Why did you choose WiFi Tribe?

     What really sold me was the "1 month" opt-in format. I found that it was a very good option for more independent/solo travelers like me to taste co-living opportunities compared to other similar companies. I will say that I definitely made the right choice!

    What insights have you taken so far from your nomadic adventures?

    The more that I travel alone or with other people, the more I realize that every human (traveling or not) is in his/her own personal journey to reach a destination called Happiness. Regardless of where you are, people just want to be happy and I think it's important to take whatever steps you need in order to get there.

    Guatape Colombia

    What is one productivity tool you would suggest for a new nomad?

    More than a tool, I evangelize for the Pomodoro Technique (time management technique that utilizes 25 minute timed intervals for dedicated work). In my case, realizing that I have a limited time to do something simply motivates me to stay focused and invest the most energy. Lately, I've also been using Forrest App and loving it. This app adds a gamification dimension to the technique :)

    Any further advice on how to make it as a digital nomad?

    A digital nomadic life is not a life for everyone, but it's definitely worth trying out. The worst that can happen is that you realize you don't like it and go back home lol, but you'll never know unless you try!

    Jungle Trek - Salento, Colombia

    Books that have helped me in my life:

    1. Ralph Potts - Vagabonding: An uncommon guide for the Art of Long-Term World Travel
    2. Jason Friend and David Heinemeier - Remote: Office Not Required
    3. Chris Guillebeau - The Happiness of Pursuit
    4. Paulo Coelho - The Alchemist

     

     

    As we continue to meet some of the most interesting individuals on our on tribe journey, maybe you could be one of them? :) Here's to hoping you will join us one day and share some of your own life experiences to help others in the same boat!